When posting comments

January 17, 2008

Something I am running into in trying to describe the various functions of a blog are the particular aspects of the comment field. I as the author of this blog have the ability to put pretty much anything I want as a post, anything from a video, an image, an audio file and each of these can be activated from the front page or the post page on my site. This multimedia aspect of a blog is very important and should be considered one of its defining elements as a writing space, it is not limited in the same way a book is. When I get to the publishing aspects of blogs later on I feel that this part should prove to be very interesting. By that I mean how does one print a multimedia blog? Has it been done?

I don’t know…

But that is off topic for this. I have a question for the blogosphere today and it has to do with comments. I know that one can put text and even hypertext as a comment to a post but can one put images and sound? And if one can’t because I don’t believe it is possible with WordPress is it possible with other blog providers?

I think that the comment aspect of blogging plays a very important role in the community based creation of this type of internet art. For the first time, well maybe not the first time but it is the most influential, readers can become authors of the blogs they read by adding their two cents.

So blogosphere become authors of my work and comment.

Huysmans


Being Dated.

December 20, 2007

So since I know have the ground working for working on this thesis something that I have been thinking about a lot lately is the momentary aspect of my research. The moment I make a statement about the current situation, that statement becomes dated. Today we are dealing with a system that’s most fundamental tradition is a tradition of change.

 

I bring this up now for one reason in particular, my roommate has just recently started a flickr.com account and we both have become rather excited about the potential it has for him. I myself have begun to ponder on the idea of creating one for my photos, for no other reason then to pack them up on the internet. But also because it is nice to be able to share travels and experience and for those who are trying to become photographers like my roommate, it is a good way to get out there.

 

So why do I bring up flickr when talking about blogs? I’m sure the answer is obvious to most of you (it wasn’t to me at first) but because perhaps the blog is not a literary tool. I am excited to do my thesis and will work it to its conclusion but what I am pondering right now is the reality that we need to move away from placing these new tools in old media and just establish them as new media. I intend to do this with my thesis but at the same time my goal is to look at their literary potential, by that I mean I am not using flickr for my research.

 

If I was to write a book rather than a thesis though I think that looking at these online blogs,vlogs, photo blogs, and so forth should be brought under one new medium, the internet, a medium that has no restrictions save one, it is not tangible. Everything created exists and only exists on the internet, in that specific format.

 

So here is to being dated and to always need those addendums.

 

Huysmans.


Addendum to part 2 of the conclusion: The potential may or may not become the actual.

December 18, 2007

This will follow the single bullet that is currently under the section regarding why we are still only talking about potential.

o   A second point to discuss here is the financial aspects of blogs not being financially viable. It is possible that they fail to achieve literary greatness because greatness in our society for art has been closely tied to monetary value. This we would have to redefine greatness in order to allow blogs to compare. The age old question of a tree in the forest appears here with the question of whether something can be art if no one sees it.

o   Secondly I want to look at the role of publishers as authority figures, as donors of credibility. Similar to what awards to, publishers, simply by choosing to publish a work of literature, suggest its increased artistic merit over the rest of what is submitted to them. This process right now does not exist online. But it does exist in a new and developing form. Today the equivalent to the publishers would be both the already existing A-list blogs commenting and taking note of a new blog and the simple number of visitors to a blog. Both these aspects function as publishers do, as filters to direct viewers to good and worthy content.

§  But on the other hand these are subverted by the mere category effect which allows similar minded readers to find blogs based on content, but again the ones featured in search results will be the popular ones.


Outline for my Thesis on blogs

December 18, 2007

What follows is an outline for my thesis on the topic of the literary merit of blogs. I am very eager to receive feed back and suggestions also advice on where to search for more content. Thank you in advance.

Huysmans.

Introduction:

Here I want to introduce the topic starting with describing both the intermediality in art today as well as the multimedia aspects of the internet. I will begin this thesis and the introduction with a discussion of my own blog and my own travels in the blogosphere. I know the idea of an intro is to introduce the topic so I plan to extend the conversation here to touch upon how blogs have affected much more than just an e-community.

·         The story of my own blog

o   I feel that the best way to dive into this topic is to describe how I dove into it. I don’t plan on this being long at all but I do intend for it to wet the pallet of the reader and to engage them into why this might be of interest to them.

·         Art in the 21st century

o   This section will focus on two major trends: intermediality in “old media” and multimedia in “new media.”

§  With the study of intermediality I want to focus on works like The Pillow Book and the popularity of adaption to emphasis the cross media work being done today. The thesis of this section is to suggest that old media (Print, TV, Radio, Film) are working very hard today to interact, TV shows based on films, films based on musicals based on films, films acting as visual novels, and of course novels made into musicals made into films. The idea of all this cross over and what may be driving it, to enhance the story and bring the story to multiple audiences, or both.

§  The second aspect of this section is to look at the role the internet has played in this. Again here there are two trends I want to focus one. One is the role of the internet in regards to old media, viral marketing campaigns, characters from television shows having their own blogs, publishers adding literary content to accompany a novel on line. The second part is to look at art that can only exist online. This will work to introduce the blog but it will also look at a graphic novel made exclusively for a Facebook application, digital/visual poetry as well as the new version of blogs that incorporate every type of media (visual, auditory, and textual).

o   I will conclude this section by connecting these two elements to suggest that when in modernism the importance of the medium was fundamental to advancing its specific art, the 21st century has abandoned such uniqueness in favor of a new medium, a multimedium (the internet).

Section 1: The Blog

This section will focus entirely on getting the reader acquainted with the blog. Here is where I plan on providing the history of the blog, beginning briefly with the history of the internet, and followed mostly by the development of the weblog and then the blog. The goal of this section is for the reader to understand all the elements that go into the creation of a blog today and how that is new and different from say ten years ago. I want to stress the development of user friendly software along with the development boom of the internet itself. Since I plan on discussing the online literary community later, I want to make sure the reader understands the power of such organizations such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, Second Life, Blogger, WordPress, and a few others that are key players in the literary world of the internet.

·         The Blog: Past, Present, and Future

o   This part is pretty self explanatory; it will describe in brief the history of the weblog as well as parallel it with the development of the internet and later the development of social software and web 2.0. This terminology is important and will all be explained here.

o   This chapter will then focus on the world of the blog today. I want to provide the reader with an understanding of how the blog is being used today.

§  Starting with the original weblog feature as a web filter.

§  Moving on to discuss the most popular use as a public diary.

§  Briefly touching upon its new role in journalism.

§  Lastly talking about its community development power.

o   Before moving on to the future aspects I will provide a section on the use of blogs and other social software tools, such as the examples mentioned above. The ultimate idea is for the reader to understand what is meant by “digital life” and how one might experience a “second life” through their online persona.

o   The third part will be to talk about the blog’s potential future and where bloggers today want to see it going.

§  This will mostly focus on its potential as a new form of publishing as well as its untapped power as a community builder.

·         NOTE: It may be beneficial to break up this into three sections instead of slating it all under one. To be honest I have not put much thought into exactly how I am to organize all of this beyond dividing it up into sections. Perhaps this section would have three chapters: Past, Present and Future. There is arguably enough material to do that. Or perhaps this section may not be as pertinent with the discussion of literary merit and should be reduced to just a chapter in the following section.

Section 2: The Literary World Online

            This section may be the largest as it will focus on the developing literary community on the internet. The key components of this section are the literary blogs. There are two major types of literary blogs, blogs that are producing their own literature and blogs that are acting as book reviewers. In addition to these two types of blogs I will also focus on the extensive community elements built around blogs of this sort: annual writing competitions, online literary journals, blogging communities voicing opinions about the established literary authorities, and published writers blogging about the writing process.  

·         The New Literary Medium

o   This first section will delve into the literary merit of a blog. I will divide this into three aspects, which will be first is yet to be established but generally I see it going as follows:

o   The Public Journal: I want to look at this “genre” as fiction itself, similar to an autobiography. This genre has no regulations forcing it to be factual and has no pre-established criteria save the general concept of what one logs in his/her diary.

§  Thus I want to explore what makes this genre unique: it has no fixed end, it is written by one author but is aided by the contributions of the general public who choose to contribute, it has no limitation as to the type of medium used in an entry (videos, images, and sound bites can all be added), and it uses the power of hypertext (text that can be linked throughout the web allowing for the artistic experience to then incorporate more writers and more readers and more communities from across the internet).

·         Each of these points will be further explained, especially the last on hypertext theory. I plan on spending some time discussing hypertext theory and its original research long before the blog existed.

o   The fictional blog: This section will look at how the same aspects of the public journal are then applied to a piece of fiction that is submitted to an audience via a blog. Basically this section will look at writers who are publishing through blogs rather than print.

§  Questions to be raised in this section are how the blog format affects narration; what role do the commentators play; and how the story is being presented (this is different from the first aspect in that the first point will focus on how the blogger is utilizing the specific attributes of a blog to expand his story, such as hypertext and multimedia elements; while this section will look at how these elements are being presented in the blog, what makes up a post? How are they archived? And so forth).

§  Another aspect of this section is how the blogger relates to the work of fiction; is it explicit that we are reading fiction? Does the blogger chime in with commentary on how the story is progressing? In general does the writer acknowledge his own separate existence from the story or does he allow the entire blog to be part of the fictional story. These aspects are important to evaluate how narrative is being changed when fiction is being written for a blog versus print.

o   The portfolio blog: this final section will expand on the blogs where the author controls the blog beyond any one specific story. For example a novelist may make one blog for just that one novel. This would fall under the previous section. But that same novelist may have a blog for submitting poetry and short stories, that blog would go here. The idea is to look at how fiction is being presented in compilation.

§  Other things I want to touch on but they may end up in other sections are the works of blogs by multiple authors and the literary works done in other online mediums, such as Facebook and Second Life.

·         The New Literary Community

o   This section will focus on the literary blogs that discuss literature. General trends of these blogs are to provide book reviews, assist in online marketing of authors through interviews and promotional pieces, discuss events affecting the literary world such as the writer’s strike, independent book store closings, the release of the Amazon Kindle and so forth. More specifically I want to focus on the literary blogs that are run by writers themselves as some of the time they discuss the writing process, making it much more personal for their audience as well as aspiring writers who my stumble upon their site.

o   Literary Blogs by Writers:

§  This section will arguably be the most dominant in this part of the thesis as these blogs have had some large scale affects on the literary community. I have yet to outline the specific ones I will look at but for sure this will include The Elegant Variation and Bookslut two book review blogs that have taken a lot of readership away from the New York Times.

§  The goal of looking at these blogs is to look at how they change the way the community looks at reading, these are not critics writing at us but rather with us and trying to engage us in a discussion of the merits of the texts they are reviewing.

§  I also plan on commenting on the fact that in response to these blogs, The New York Times created their own blog called Papercuts.

§  In this section I will also look at how these writers describe their own work and engage their audience in the writing process, providing updates on how they are conducting research, going through the motions of writing each day, working with copyeditors, and lastly the feeling of having a published book arrive for your approval.

o   Literary E-Journals

§  In this section I want to look at the movement to collect and catalog work electronically and avoid printing almost entirely. There is one being formed through facebook that I plan on reviewing as well as blogs that are attempting to archive literary blogs themselves as well as help in a wiki movement to archive sources of electronic literature.

§  I will describe in this section as well the phenomenon of the National Novel Writing Month or NaNoWriMo which takes place in November and is a competition for anyone interested to attempt to write a novel in one month’s time while blogging about your progress through their website, or linked to their website should you already have an established blog.

·         There was much discussion along the way with this event and many bloggers described in depth the struggle to meet their goals.

·         Many bloggers blogged each other words of encouragement and such.

·         Surprisingly everyone is very friendly to each other, not really any signs of competition.

o   Connecting with the Real World

§  Here I want to look at how the literary world is incorporating blogs into the print world of literature. I will define the “Virtual Book Tour” here and discuss how it is quickly becoming a necessity for any up and coming author. I also want to look at the roll of programs like Myspace and Facebook in the marketing aspects of book promotions. This will not focus as much on blogs but rather discuss how Web 2.0 and 3.0 is augmenting the literary community.

§  This section will also focus on the death of book review sections in newspapers and suggest the correlation between the decrease in print reviews and the increase in digital literary communities.

Section 3: Publication

Finally with this third section I want to look at the question hidden behind this entire discussion: will blogs replace the book? To answer this I want to introduce the new forms of publication: Print on Demand or POD publishers. I will make the suggestion that the democratization that blogging provided for writers has been further established by the development of these POD publishers who will assist independent writers with publishing their books, each POD is different and some bloggers have blogged heavily on which are the good ones and the ones to avoid. Furthermore I want to look back at the journals I described early to discuss the differences between print journals and e-journals. In the end I will suggest that the printed book will continue to exist but its existence will most certainly be challenged by this new community.

·         PODs and traditional publishers

o   This section will focus on the development of POD publishers; I have some that I am looking at specifically to use as explanations for how they work. Also many bloggers have discussed using PODs and have thus incorporated them into the literary blogging community making them important when describing the role that publishers play. I will also discuss that they are still a print service but one created for an internet world. So this small section will have two parts.

o   The history of the PODs

§  This section will provide the history of the POD publications and look at their use today. I will also provide here examples of PODs and talk about how they are used and their popularity among writers.

§  Many articles have been written about how they are affecting more traditional publications.

o   Blogger response to PODs

§  Here I want to briefly address how bloggers are responding and communicating with PODs, many bloggers share their lists of which ones they like and don’t like and so on.

·         Digital publications

o   This section will return to the digital journals I mentioned earlier and discuss them more form the aspect of how they differ from their printed cousins. I want to look at how those differences affect their form, content, and readership. What is also important is to look at how digital writers perceive them. Do writers write differently know that what they are writing will not be printed but rather digitally presented? So to stick with the same form as the previous section this will have two aspects.

o   An aesthetic analysis of the digital journals themselves

§  I am still working on choosing which ones to follow but the idea is to compare them to print journals and look at how they work differently and similarly and what compels these differences or maintains these similarities? Is the medium of the internet being used affectively to establish these journals? Are they just digital replicas of what could be printed?

o   A community analysis

§  Here I want to look at the people who both contribute to these journals and those who subscribe to them. What do bloggers have to say about digital journals? How do writers write differently for them?

·         The Future of the Book

o   With this last section I want to expand the discussion a little to introduce the new Kindle device by Amazon along with some other anecdotes I have come across in regards to digital presentation of literature. Writers are looking to write for digital screens and devices, such as cell phones. I want to engage the reader in thinking about how the book might be affected not by digital publication but simply by digital democracy and community. And were the book to be replaced, would writers then write differently knowing it would never take that form? Will the Kindle change the way we write if it succeeds in changing the way we read?

Conclusion

            Finally with this last section I will conclude the thesis by suggesting that the blog may in fact be a new style of literature, rather than a degradation of language. But I will also look to describe the current literary community both online and off. Two very important points I want to stress here is that even this paper will be dated from the moment it is written and that much of the discussion has been on the potential and not the actual. It is important to concede the point that no work of fiction that has appeared on a blog has had the readership of a New York Times best seller. But like the former point states, this thesis is dated and that might not even be true come March. I want to look at the possible reasons why this is still very much a potential outcome and not an actual one, mostly I will discuss the newness of this medium and that like Film it will need time to establish itself.

·         The power gone bad

o   To start the conclusion I want to share the story of Kaycee Nelson, a fictional character who had a blog and blogged about being a college student with leukemia. She became very famous as her words were extremely encouraging and empowering; she was even quoted by the New York Times. But eventually it came out that she was entirely fictional.

§  Thus I want to talk about how all this creative power can be abused and used to deceive. But on the flip side it is still art, it is shocking like Duchamp was but in a new way. 

·         The potential may or may not become the actual

o   This section as stated above will look at why we are still discussing the potential of blogs and not the actuality of them. Though much of my discussion will be on the actuality very few have utilized blogs to the full extent of the medium and this section will look into why that is. More specifically I want to focus on the theories that suggest this dilemma is due to the newness factor of blogs and that a new medium of art needs time to establish itself before its masterpieces are produced.

·         Final Thoughts

o   This last section is where I will suggest my own opinion that a blog represents a new genre of literature while also suggesting the fact that even my own work is dated in regards to this topic, that tomorrow will bring a totally new perspective. Furthermore I will use my idea of what a blog represents to connect all the elements of this thesis back together, the multimedia aspect, the literary community online, digital journals, public diaries, printing on demand, and everything else back the blog.


Audience or Public

November 26, 2007

            One person I have discovered to be very important to any study on weblogs and their history is Rebecca Blood, who has become a voice of authority on the issue of weblogs solely because she has been a longtime blogger, since 1996, three years before the user friendly software of Blogger came out.  In an essay titled “Weblogs: A History and Perspective” written by Blood on September 7th in 2000 and was later published in We’ve got blog: how weblogs are changing our culture, describes the short history of weblogs and how they started as filters for finding more interesting web content.

            Her essay describes the two major trends in blogging, the first being that of a filter where a creator would post a link, a title, and some commentary in regards to where the link leads, while the other (now more popular) form is that of the short-form journal where the creator would post daily (or more frequently) about anything from thoughts to stories of the day to free writing experiments. What develops from software like Blogger and WordPress is the current blogging community where the active dialogue between publisher and viewer helps evolve the artistic creation of the blog. Blood poses a very interesting question with her final statements:

           

            “I strongly believe in the power of weblogs to transform both writers and readers from ‘audience’ to ‘public’ and from ‘consumer’ to ‘creator.’”

           

            In my thesis I am eager to reserve a large section of it to look at this relationship between the writer and the reader, the interaction between the two in this artistic process is something that has probably never been seen before in the world of art. In no other medium does the spectator have the ability to comment while the piece is being created, save maybe an improvised performance where the audience can show their approval or disapproval. But the setup of this type of performance is drastically different than that of the blog, for here even though it is improvised it is being viewed as such, and the performer is not directly involved in a discussion with any single member of that audience. Where as in blogs each audience member has a voice, they all collectively become a public as Blood suggests.

 

So I pose the question, does this apparent democratization of art really affects the creation of art in any new way? Or better yet, is it really there? Are we a public now or are we still an audience and perhaps this dialogue is just another form of cultural control, something Adorno would probably suggest about the current situation.

 

As always I eagerly await your thoughts,

Huysmans


Blogging as literature exactly

November 18, 2007

In working through this thesis I have stumbled upon something interesting, well many interesting things but for this post I have one in particular. I have realized through correcting typos of my own as well as managing incoming comments that in the end, despite all the social software advantages of blogs, they can be used to create exact digital replicas of books. Each post or rather each category can be used as chapters while the blog itself can be designed to simply maintain the internet publication of the book rather than physically publishing it.

 

 

 

Yes blogs have all these extra abilities but with most sites, those extra abilities are regulated through the blogger. Thus if one so chooses, a blog can be no different than a book and operate in exactly the same way.

 

 

 

This may seem simple and obvious to some but it does provide something important in the continued pursuit of mapping the blog; as a potentially different medium, it can be exactly the same.

 

 

Thoughts?

 

 

Huysmans


Narrative Blogs

November 17, 2007

Narratology, ie the study of narrative, is fairly new and somewhat controversial in the world of critical theory. For reasons that I am only beginning to understand, narratology takes the point of view that a narrative, that which is loosely defined as a story, can exist in any medium, that even music follows a narrative pattern, classical music that is. They are not saying that all music is a narrative at its base but they are saying that a narrative can exist in music and can be expressed by it. Now this idea becomes very interesting because it is something that connects all forms of art. Perhaps the only thing beyond the title of art and the various descriptions of different movements, is narrative. Does it truly exist and some super connection between mediums?

Well I bring this up now because in placing blogs as a medium we have to make sure they fit this mold, and obviously enough they do. However there is something interesting in blogs, that is their innate ability to disrupt one chain of thought with the hyperlink. Blogs being based on hypertext fundamentally do not have to follow a narrative path. Now one could argue that that is true as well as the narrative existence in a blog, that they both can exist, like classical and modern compositions are both music yet one doubles as a narrative. And that is true. But the existence of classical music as a narrative was designed that way, and introduced to its audience that way. Blogs cannot be compared to that because they work fundementally different. When one stumbles upon a blog they rarely stumble upon that first post, I know for myself I did not start receiving views until I posted on journalism, thus it is extremely rare for someone to start reading a blog with the start of the blogs narrative, but not impossible. However this brings up a very important difference between blogs and almost all other types of art, the interaction with the reader. Blogs are not stand alone art works, they exist as art based on their interaction with readers. This last point is very debatable, but what isn’t is that blogs are not linear, even if the creator’s intent is a linear blog, few readers will approach it as such.

A second interesting difference or rather challenge to the idea of narrative in blogs is the influence of the comments, if you have a blogger who is slowly publishing a novel through their blog by publishing each chapter, say each week, that narrative they are developing will be interrupted by the commentary received through replies to the posts.  Yes it is still a narrativ, but it is an evolving narrative, one that one could say is self reflexive, always evolving and reestablishing itself.

These ideas of mine, that of comparing blogs to narratology, are not just my own but rather represent my initial thoughts upon starting to read Avatars of Story by Marie-Laure Ryan, a narratologist with some very interesting ideas.

Thoughts?

Huysmans