something introductory: Intermediality vs Multimedia

February 4, 2008

One hundred years ago the modernist tendency thrust itself upon western society through one keen shift in the way the act of creation was approached. Modernist artists discovered the uniqueness of the media in which they worked and exploited those differences in order to define their styles. With the trend of self-criticism, artist such as Pablo Picasso were able to approach three dimensional presentations through a lens that only a painting can recreate, cubism. Music saw composers like Igor Stravinsky who sought to redefine musical composition by experimenting with dissonance and narrative composition. Lastly in literature writers like Virginia Wolff and Franz Kafka used the narrative form of expression itself to aid their narrative styles of storytelling. From an observational point of view cubism and Kafka share very little, but when looking at how both Picasso and Kafka approached their work, they become similar in that they used what makes the medium unique. Medium specificity established the course of art for the twentieth century, paving the way for the convergence of media in the internet age of the twenty-first century.

The modernist course of art has evolved into the contemporary, postmodernist art world of today. Speaking generally, and utilizing postmodernist tendencies, the walls erected by modernism in exploring the specificity of media are being knocked down as the focus of exploration shifts from what is unique to what is shared. New works of art are exploring the relationship between media rather than the characteristics unique to each medium. Peter Greenaway’s The Pillow Book best emphasizes this new exploration. The film can be described as a visual representation of literature. The film uses literary tools to communicate while also transforming language into a visual art. The premise of the film revolves around a fledgling writer seeking to stake her claim in the publishing world. Frustrated by the rejection from her late father’s publisher, and lover, she seeks to use the publisher’s new lover in order to manipulate the publisher into publishing her work. She manipulates both the publisher and the lover by seducing the lover and using his body to transmit her text to the publisher. Thus the audience is given both a cinematic narrative between the three characters as well as secondary references to this literary narrative being created and distributed via a human body. The film uses, as its language of communication with the audience and with the characters, the written form in multiple languages. This form is presented visually, not aurally, and does not provide translation when presented in a foreign language. Ultimately the text in the film is not presented to be read by the audience but rather to be viewed. The characters, however, see the visual text as literature and seek to own it as quickly as possible. Were a text made cinematic it would not be interpreted for cinema like the multiple adaptations of classical literature currently popular in American cinematography, but rather it would be transformed into the cinematic image. Joy Sisley in an essay on the intermediality of The Pillow Book suggests “that as a radical mediation of writing The Pillow Book not only upsets a conventional separation of word and image as two separate entities and mutually exclusive media, but also figuratively closes the conceptual gap between word and image by reminding us that writing is a visual medium” (Literary Intermediality, 36).[1]  By closing the gap between word and image The Pillow Book skates the line between literature and film. Now it is very apparent as to which side of the line this “film” falls on, but nonetheless there are elements of the film that are more reflective of a literary narrative, such as the lack of any one character describing that which is written on numerous bodies throughout the film. The film’s inspiration is a real book written by Sei Shonagon at the end of the 10th century in imperial Japan. Shonagon’s pillow book was a journal of sorts where she kept detailed lists, comparisons, poetry and various other entries she felt a need to remember. The movie pays homage to this text through paying homage to the literary tradition. By emphasizing the visual aspects of literature, this film acknowledges the intermediality between the two forms of art. The essence of the book is preserved literally through the words on the body, while the film narrative seeks to create a relationship between text and image.

The late 20th century saw an increased focus in this intermediality with the rise of adaptations as well as new original works. It is very easy to brush off adaptations as unoriginal works of art reflective of a financially driven industry, but it is naïve to suggest that these reinterpreted narratives do not provide their own “original” elements. Take for example A Charlie Brown Christmas animated short, the first animated version of the famous Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. Today the film and its soundtrack, composed by Vince Guaraldi, are seen as synonymous with Charlie Brown himself. But the original Peanuts comic strip was only a comic with no musical accompaniment. Once the Peanuts characters were combined with Guaraldi’s music, a relationship formed that transformed the narrative for a new medium, television, giving it a whole new depth and perspective. This new version is not a stand alone television special however, its style of story telling is completely reflective of the comic strip character that originated the story, thus it is a hybrid animation created through the combined processes of comic narrative styles and animated. auditory elements. The idea of retelling a narrative through a new medium is not a new concept; artists have been visualizing mythical narratives for centuries. But the way in which these different medium interpretations are interacting is. For example when the NBC television drama, Heroes premiered in the fall of 2006 it was accompanied by an online graphic novel that was published once a week, with the airing of every new television episode. The comic described back stories to the characters featured in the series while foreshadowing events to come. The comic was not a retelling of the show but rather it added additional narratives to the ones featured on screen. While it helped to advance the narrative it also reflected the intermediality of the show itself, a cinematized comic strip. Though the show’s narrative was completely original, it was inspired by earlier comic strips such as Superman and X-Men. Thus in the late age of modernism or rather in the age of postmodernism, media are integrating to evolve the narratives they are telling; giving The Lord of the Rings trilogy a cinematic equivalent complete with theme music or showing the tragic hero behind the wicked witch of the west from The Wizard of Oz in Wicked.

On the other side of this push towards intermediality is the immersion of a new medium of artistic expression, the computer and more specifically the internet. Thus far the medium of the internet has been mostly used to present preexisting art to a wider audience. The medium specific art for such a tool is still be debated, the argument of the artistic merit of video games and websites has not come to a close just yet. But it is important to understand that too many who are exploring the artistic potential of blogs and the internet at large do believe to a certain extent that the creativity behind the creation of a webpage deserves the same kind of respect as the artists who use brushes and canvas to express themselves. What can be agreed upon is the artistic potential of such a tool. The internet, using the computer as its tool for communication, acts as a fully interactive virtual space where anything from a painting, song to even video clip can be transmitted. This versatility allows it to be extremely adaptable to our growing desire for intermediality. As mention above, the NBC television show, Heroes, used the internet to publish its graphic novel that accompanied the show’s weekly airing. This novel could have been put into print, in fact in its online form it used many of the signature characteristics of graphic novels in print, such as the thought bubbles and organizational structure, the latter of which does not aide an internet reader in following the narrative. Because they placed this graphic novel online there were able to present it in multiple forms: a printable version, an interactive version, and an animated version. Each version of the comic told the same story but used different attributes to tell it, attributes that before the internet would have been considered medium specific. The internet as it is being used in the year 2008 (this distinction is extremely important as the uses and design of the internet are very rapidly changing in its ever growing popularity) has defined the idea of multimedia. Therefore the concept of an internet based artwork utilizing multiple media to present the creative idea is neither unique to blogs nor does it originate from them. But as we will see blogs have served a crucial role in expanding the concept of the internet’s multimedia capabilities.


[1] Literary Intermediality, 36

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We’ve got blog

January 8, 2008

I am finally back from vacation and have finished the collection of essays titled We’ve got blog: how weblogs are changing our culture. It was a very interesting collection, very diverse, and will be very helpful in understanding more of the specifics in regards to the history of the blog. However the funny thing about anything in print in regards to this topic is that it becomes immediately dated. All the essays in here are from the late 90s through 2002, which makes sense since the book was published in 03 and for a book that’s recent. But still in regards to the “A-List” blogs they talk about in the book, well many don’t update anymore.

 

But the important part is that it gave me some good perspective on the blog’s development. It’s interesting to me, but yet not surprising, that it started as a filter, as a collection of interesting links within the internet, one could say that that purpose is still around today, in fact most probably would, if not through the posts and tags then through the blogroll, but the blogroll isn’t updated regularly like the original weblogs were. I know from the book that the debate on which is a real blog still exists, or at least it did then.

 

Something I find rather interesting about this collection of essays is that there is no discussion of art in the blogs, these writers don’t identify as authors, many as journalists and probably a few as strictly writers or bloggers, but what is interesting is that they don’t see their work as art.

 

Something that I have been toying with is the idea that the public journal aspect of a blog, the type of blog that has become the most popular form of blogging today is in fact a genre of literature, a theme for writing if you will. I believe that it is a hybrid of an autobiography with the essences of a collaborative work such as the Surrealists would do. I know or rather can imagine that there are bloggers out there that honestly write what really does happen to them in that given post but they are still adding opinion, interpretation, hopefully artistic exaggeration, and lets not forget style and format, all of which are artistic and literary themes so therefore I would almost venture to say that these blogs if they were to be found in say a Barnes & Nobel they would be found under the section of Blog Journal, which would be next to Magical Realism and Autobiographies.

 

Just my thoughts and I know it’s a week late but.

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR and good luck in ‘08

 

Huysmans


Facebook as Literature

December 21, 2007

I used to think, and by used to I mean up until this week, that these new fangled applications on facebook were not just a waste of time but a disgrace to the essence of what is Facebook. Well that was back when I was elitist for being a college student and couldn’t get over the fact that now high schoolers had accounts. Though I wouldn’t say I am passed that phase of my Facebook relationship I have come to see some value in these applications.

 

I bring it up here because it is rather interesting to see how the literary world has utilized it. First I want to introduce a rather interesting and simply engaging application I found through Chris Joseph’s blog. The novel is called Why Some Dolls Are Bad and it is a graphic novel and is dynamically generated through a Facebook application by the same name. I highly recommend looking into it.

 

It is works like this that are key resources for reviewing the literary potential of blogs, though this app itself is not a blog it does use many of the unique blog features I plan on discussing, such as hypertext, mixmedia, and a community set up through the app users. But again it isn’t a blog in that we cannot directly communicate with the novel author, Kate Armstrong.

 

Anyway it is something worth checking out and thanks to Chris for pointing it out.

 

On another note on Facebook I have also added the scrabble game, a game I like to think helps stimulate writers and with it on Facebook I can enter multiple games at once with my friends that take place over a long period of time, a cute way to remind me about how bad my vocabulary is. For example below is my attempt at trying to make words with the letters I had, I have decided that it makes some rather interesting phonetic poetry, or just crap. You can decide for yourself.

 

Huysmans.

 

Dif tif dif nif wintow woodin wid

 

Woodint winotod

 

Windoo windot wondit wond windo woodi n tinwood nitwood woodnit inwood


Being Dated.

December 20, 2007

So since I know have the ground working for working on this thesis something that I have been thinking about a lot lately is the momentary aspect of my research. The moment I make a statement about the current situation, that statement becomes dated. Today we are dealing with a system that’s most fundamental tradition is a tradition of change.

 

I bring this up now for one reason in particular, my roommate has just recently started a flickr.com account and we both have become rather excited about the potential it has for him. I myself have begun to ponder on the idea of creating one for my photos, for no other reason then to pack them up on the internet. But also because it is nice to be able to share travels and experience and for those who are trying to become photographers like my roommate, it is a good way to get out there.

 

So why do I bring up flickr when talking about blogs? I’m sure the answer is obvious to most of you (it wasn’t to me at first) but because perhaps the blog is not a literary tool. I am excited to do my thesis and will work it to its conclusion but what I am pondering right now is the reality that we need to move away from placing these new tools in old media and just establish them as new media. I intend to do this with my thesis but at the same time my goal is to look at their literary potential, by that I mean I am not using flickr for my research.

 

If I was to write a book rather than a thesis though I think that looking at these online blogs,vlogs, photo blogs, and so forth should be brought under one new medium, the internet, a medium that has no restrictions save one, it is not tangible. Everything created exists and only exists on the internet, in that specific format.

 

So here is to being dated and to always need those addendums.

 

Huysmans.


Addendum to part 2 of the conclusion: The potential may or may not become the actual.

December 18, 2007

This will follow the single bullet that is currently under the section regarding why we are still only talking about potential.

o   A second point to discuss here is the financial aspects of blogs not being financially viable. It is possible that they fail to achieve literary greatness because greatness in our society for art has been closely tied to monetary value. This we would have to redefine greatness in order to allow blogs to compare. The age old question of a tree in the forest appears here with the question of whether something can be art if no one sees it.

o   Secondly I want to look at the role of publishers as authority figures, as donors of credibility. Similar to what awards to, publishers, simply by choosing to publish a work of literature, suggest its increased artistic merit over the rest of what is submitted to them. This process right now does not exist online. But it does exist in a new and developing form. Today the equivalent to the publishers would be both the already existing A-list blogs commenting and taking note of a new blog and the simple number of visitors to a blog. Both these aspects function as publishers do, as filters to direct viewers to good and worthy content.

§  But on the other hand these are subverted by the mere category effect which allows similar minded readers to find blogs based on content, but again the ones featured in search results will be the popular ones.


Outline for my Thesis on blogs

December 18, 2007

What follows is an outline for my thesis on the topic of the literary merit of blogs. I am very eager to receive feed back and suggestions also advice on where to search for more content. Thank you in advance.

Huysmans.

Introduction:

Here I want to introduce the topic starting with describing both the intermediality in art today as well as the multimedia aspects of the internet. I will begin this thesis and the introduction with a discussion of my own blog and my own travels in the blogosphere. I know the idea of an intro is to introduce the topic so I plan to extend the conversation here to touch upon how blogs have affected much more than just an e-community.

·         The story of my own blog

o   I feel that the best way to dive into this topic is to describe how I dove into it. I don’t plan on this being long at all but I do intend for it to wet the pallet of the reader and to engage them into why this might be of interest to them.

·         Art in the 21st century

o   This section will focus on two major trends: intermediality in “old media” and multimedia in “new media.”

§  With the study of intermediality I want to focus on works like The Pillow Book and the popularity of adaption to emphasis the cross media work being done today. The thesis of this section is to suggest that old media (Print, TV, Radio, Film) are working very hard today to interact, TV shows based on films, films based on musicals based on films, films acting as visual novels, and of course novels made into musicals made into films. The idea of all this cross over and what may be driving it, to enhance the story and bring the story to multiple audiences, or both.

§  The second aspect of this section is to look at the role the internet has played in this. Again here there are two trends I want to focus one. One is the role of the internet in regards to old media, viral marketing campaigns, characters from television shows having their own blogs, publishers adding literary content to accompany a novel on line. The second part is to look at art that can only exist online. This will work to introduce the blog but it will also look at a graphic novel made exclusively for a Facebook application, digital/visual poetry as well as the new version of blogs that incorporate every type of media (visual, auditory, and textual).

o   I will conclude this section by connecting these two elements to suggest that when in modernism the importance of the medium was fundamental to advancing its specific art, the 21st century has abandoned such uniqueness in favor of a new medium, a multimedium (the internet).

Section 1: The Blog

This section will focus entirely on getting the reader acquainted with the blog. Here is where I plan on providing the history of the blog, beginning briefly with the history of the internet, and followed mostly by the development of the weblog and then the blog. The goal of this section is for the reader to understand all the elements that go into the creation of a blog today and how that is new and different from say ten years ago. I want to stress the development of user friendly software along with the development boom of the internet itself. Since I plan on discussing the online literary community later, I want to make sure the reader understands the power of such organizations such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, Second Life, Blogger, WordPress, and a few others that are key players in the literary world of the internet.

·         The Blog: Past, Present, and Future

o   This part is pretty self explanatory; it will describe in brief the history of the weblog as well as parallel it with the development of the internet and later the development of social software and web 2.0. This terminology is important and will all be explained here.

o   This chapter will then focus on the world of the blog today. I want to provide the reader with an understanding of how the blog is being used today.

§  Starting with the original weblog feature as a web filter.

§  Moving on to discuss the most popular use as a public diary.

§  Briefly touching upon its new role in journalism.

§  Lastly talking about its community development power.

o   Before moving on to the future aspects I will provide a section on the use of blogs and other social software tools, such as the examples mentioned above. The ultimate idea is for the reader to understand what is meant by “digital life” and how one might experience a “second life” through their online persona.

o   The third part will be to talk about the blog’s potential future and where bloggers today want to see it going.

§  This will mostly focus on its potential as a new form of publishing as well as its untapped power as a community builder.

·         NOTE: It may be beneficial to break up this into three sections instead of slating it all under one. To be honest I have not put much thought into exactly how I am to organize all of this beyond dividing it up into sections. Perhaps this section would have three chapters: Past, Present and Future. There is arguably enough material to do that. Or perhaps this section may not be as pertinent with the discussion of literary merit and should be reduced to just a chapter in the following section.

Section 2: The Literary World Online

            This section may be the largest as it will focus on the developing literary community on the internet. The key components of this section are the literary blogs. There are two major types of literary blogs, blogs that are producing their own literature and blogs that are acting as book reviewers. In addition to these two types of blogs I will also focus on the extensive community elements built around blogs of this sort: annual writing competitions, online literary journals, blogging communities voicing opinions about the established literary authorities, and published writers blogging about the writing process.  

·         The New Literary Medium

o   This first section will delve into the literary merit of a blog. I will divide this into three aspects, which will be first is yet to be established but generally I see it going as follows:

o   The Public Journal: I want to look at this “genre” as fiction itself, similar to an autobiography. This genre has no regulations forcing it to be factual and has no pre-established criteria save the general concept of what one logs in his/her diary.

§  Thus I want to explore what makes this genre unique: it has no fixed end, it is written by one author but is aided by the contributions of the general public who choose to contribute, it has no limitation as to the type of medium used in an entry (videos, images, and sound bites can all be added), and it uses the power of hypertext (text that can be linked throughout the web allowing for the artistic experience to then incorporate more writers and more readers and more communities from across the internet).

·         Each of these points will be further explained, especially the last on hypertext theory. I plan on spending some time discussing hypertext theory and its original research long before the blog existed.

o   The fictional blog: This section will look at how the same aspects of the public journal are then applied to a piece of fiction that is submitted to an audience via a blog. Basically this section will look at writers who are publishing through blogs rather than print.

§  Questions to be raised in this section are how the blog format affects narration; what role do the commentators play; and how the story is being presented (this is different from the first aspect in that the first point will focus on how the blogger is utilizing the specific attributes of a blog to expand his story, such as hypertext and multimedia elements; while this section will look at how these elements are being presented in the blog, what makes up a post? How are they archived? And so forth).

§  Another aspect of this section is how the blogger relates to the work of fiction; is it explicit that we are reading fiction? Does the blogger chime in with commentary on how the story is progressing? In general does the writer acknowledge his own separate existence from the story or does he allow the entire blog to be part of the fictional story. These aspects are important to evaluate how narrative is being changed when fiction is being written for a blog versus print.

o   The portfolio blog: this final section will expand on the blogs where the author controls the blog beyond any one specific story. For example a novelist may make one blog for just that one novel. This would fall under the previous section. But that same novelist may have a blog for submitting poetry and short stories, that blog would go here. The idea is to look at how fiction is being presented in compilation.

§  Other things I want to touch on but they may end up in other sections are the works of blogs by multiple authors and the literary works done in other online mediums, such as Facebook and Second Life.

·         The New Literary Community

o   This section will focus on the literary blogs that discuss literature. General trends of these blogs are to provide book reviews, assist in online marketing of authors through interviews and promotional pieces, discuss events affecting the literary world such as the writer’s strike, independent book store closings, the release of the Amazon Kindle and so forth. More specifically I want to focus on the literary blogs that are run by writers themselves as some of the time they discuss the writing process, making it much more personal for their audience as well as aspiring writers who my stumble upon their site.

o   Literary Blogs by Writers:

§  This section will arguably be the most dominant in this part of the thesis as these blogs have had some large scale affects on the literary community. I have yet to outline the specific ones I will look at but for sure this will include The Elegant Variation and Bookslut two book review blogs that have taken a lot of readership away from the New York Times.

§  The goal of looking at these blogs is to look at how they change the way the community looks at reading, these are not critics writing at us but rather with us and trying to engage us in a discussion of the merits of the texts they are reviewing.

§  I also plan on commenting on the fact that in response to these blogs, The New York Times created their own blog called Papercuts.

§  In this section I will also look at how these writers describe their own work and engage their audience in the writing process, providing updates on how they are conducting research, going through the motions of writing each day, working with copyeditors, and lastly the feeling of having a published book arrive for your approval.

o   Literary E-Journals

§  In this section I want to look at the movement to collect and catalog work electronically and avoid printing almost entirely. There is one being formed through facebook that I plan on reviewing as well as blogs that are attempting to archive literary blogs themselves as well as help in a wiki movement to archive sources of electronic literature.

§  I will describe in this section as well the phenomenon of the National Novel Writing Month or NaNoWriMo which takes place in November and is a competition for anyone interested to attempt to write a novel in one month’s time while blogging about your progress through their website, or linked to their website should you already have an established blog.

·         There was much discussion along the way with this event and many bloggers described in depth the struggle to meet their goals.

·         Many bloggers blogged each other words of encouragement and such.

·         Surprisingly everyone is very friendly to each other, not really any signs of competition.

o   Connecting with the Real World

§  Here I want to look at how the literary world is incorporating blogs into the print world of literature. I will define the “Virtual Book Tour” here and discuss how it is quickly becoming a necessity for any up and coming author. I also want to look at the roll of programs like Myspace and Facebook in the marketing aspects of book promotions. This will not focus as much on blogs but rather discuss how Web 2.0 and 3.0 is augmenting the literary community.

§  This section will also focus on the death of book review sections in newspapers and suggest the correlation between the decrease in print reviews and the increase in digital literary communities.

Section 3: Publication

Finally with this third section I want to look at the question hidden behind this entire discussion: will blogs replace the book? To answer this I want to introduce the new forms of publication: Print on Demand or POD publishers. I will make the suggestion that the democratization that blogging provided for writers has been further established by the development of these POD publishers who will assist independent writers with publishing their books, each POD is different and some bloggers have blogged heavily on which are the good ones and the ones to avoid. Furthermore I want to look back at the journals I described early to discuss the differences between print journals and e-journals. In the end I will suggest that the printed book will continue to exist but its existence will most certainly be challenged by this new community.

·         PODs and traditional publishers

o   This section will focus on the development of POD publishers; I have some that I am looking at specifically to use as explanations for how they work. Also many bloggers have discussed using PODs and have thus incorporated them into the literary blogging community making them important when describing the role that publishers play. I will also discuss that they are still a print service but one created for an internet world. So this small section will have two parts.

o   The history of the PODs

§  This section will provide the history of the POD publications and look at their use today. I will also provide here examples of PODs and talk about how they are used and their popularity among writers.

§  Many articles have been written about how they are affecting more traditional publications.

o   Blogger response to PODs

§  Here I want to briefly address how bloggers are responding and communicating with PODs, many bloggers share their lists of which ones they like and don’t like and so on.

·         Digital publications

o   This section will return to the digital journals I mentioned earlier and discuss them more form the aspect of how they differ from their printed cousins. I want to look at how those differences affect their form, content, and readership. What is also important is to look at how digital writers perceive them. Do writers write differently know that what they are writing will not be printed but rather digitally presented? So to stick with the same form as the previous section this will have two aspects.

o   An aesthetic analysis of the digital journals themselves

§  I am still working on choosing which ones to follow but the idea is to compare them to print journals and look at how they work differently and similarly and what compels these differences or maintains these similarities? Is the medium of the internet being used affectively to establish these journals? Are they just digital replicas of what could be printed?

o   A community analysis

§  Here I want to look at the people who both contribute to these journals and those who subscribe to them. What do bloggers have to say about digital journals? How do writers write differently for them?

·         The Future of the Book

o   With this last section I want to expand the discussion a little to introduce the new Kindle device by Amazon along with some other anecdotes I have come across in regards to digital presentation of literature. Writers are looking to write for digital screens and devices, such as cell phones. I want to engage the reader in thinking about how the book might be affected not by digital publication but simply by digital democracy and community. And were the book to be replaced, would writers then write differently knowing it would never take that form? Will the Kindle change the way we write if it succeeds in changing the way we read?

Conclusion

            Finally with this last section I will conclude the thesis by suggesting that the blog may in fact be a new style of literature, rather than a degradation of language. But I will also look to describe the current literary community both online and off. Two very important points I want to stress here is that even this paper will be dated from the moment it is written and that much of the discussion has been on the potential and not the actual. It is important to concede the point that no work of fiction that has appeared on a blog has had the readership of a New York Times best seller. But like the former point states, this thesis is dated and that might not even be true come March. I want to look at the possible reasons why this is still very much a potential outcome and not an actual one, mostly I will discuss the newness of this medium and that like Film it will need time to establish itself.

·         The power gone bad

o   To start the conclusion I want to share the story of Kaycee Nelson, a fictional character who had a blog and blogged about being a college student with leukemia. She became very famous as her words were extremely encouraging and empowering; she was even quoted by the New York Times. But eventually it came out that she was entirely fictional.

§  Thus I want to talk about how all this creative power can be abused and used to deceive. But on the flip side it is still art, it is shocking like Duchamp was but in a new way. 

·         The potential may or may not become the actual

o   This section as stated above will look at why we are still discussing the potential of blogs and not the actuality of them. Though much of my discussion will be on the actuality very few have utilized blogs to the full extent of the medium and this section will look into why that is. More specifically I want to focus on the theories that suggest this dilemma is due to the newness factor of blogs and that a new medium of art needs time to establish itself before its masterpieces are produced.

·         Final Thoughts

o   This last section is where I will suggest my own opinion that a blog represents a new genre of literature while also suggesting the fact that even my own work is dated in regards to this topic, that tomorrow will bring a totally new perspective. Furthermore I will use my idea of what a blog represents to connect all the elements of this thesis back together, the multimedia aspect, the literary community online, digital journals, public diaries, printing on demand, and everything else back the blog.


Surrealist Game Time

December 3, 2007

Here is the idea for this little game. It started with Raymond Queneau, a surrealist of the Breton persuasion. He at one point in his life published a text titled Exercises in Style where he started with a Récit and then rewrote it ninety-nine times in differing styles. I have written a Récit and will follow with some styles shortly but I would love for people to submit their own styles, make sure to name your style.

Récit

This short description begins at three in the afternoon in a little campus coffee shop attached to the grand central library. The crowd packed round the water cooler. Each person waited patiently for their turn at the device to fill their little plastic transparent cubs up with the ice infused water maintained inside the metallic dispenser. It was when this crowd parted that a singular college aged individual of male features approached the register in the hopes of purchasing a muffin containing some kind of fruit flavoring as well as an espresso based beverage. What he had not prepared for was the excruciating wait time that was thrust upon him until his hot beverage would be ready. In this time he found the mundane routine of circulating somewhat pleasant but was annoyed to find myself observing this awkward task of his. He soon departed beverage and muffin in hand, for another more secure location. I remained however, to watch as more students of various ages packed themselves neatly into a line in order to maintain order while each in turn exchanged money for nourishment.

An hour later a meeting started involving myself and commenced at a different place roughly a quarter mile away from the coffee shop in the residential offices of the same university. The meeting was the third of three to be had this semester in regards to sexual assault on the campus and included students, faculty and administrators. It went long.